Manufacturers, DOE pledge to increase energy efficiency

RP news wires, Noria Corporation
Tags: energy management

The National Association of Manufacturers and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) on June 12 solidified their strong commitment to reducing the energy intensity of America’s economy by signing a memorandum of understanding, with the intent to promote, collaborate, and enhance industrial energy efficiency.

 

“Entering into this partnership with DOE to increase energy efficiency builds on the unique strength of American manufacturers as the world’s leaders in energy efficiency and conservation,” NAM president John Engler said. “Energy efficiency is an important contributor to our future energy security. Building upon manufacturers’ leadership in this area doesn’t just make energy and economic sense, but common sense.”

 

Engler was joined by DOE secretary Samuel W. Bodman, who commented that “Increasing energy efficiency is not only good practice, but it can also be good business. Today's agreement between DOE and NAM represents a significant commitment between government and the private sector to help curb our nation's energy use and enhance energy security while also reducing emissions.”

 

The memorandum of understanding supports a variety of activities which aim to assist manufacturing facilities to initiate and implement energy management programs, adopt clean energy-efficient technologies, and to achieve continual energy-efficiency and intensity-reduction improvements.

 

“The NAM has the potential to reach more than 100,000 corporations, both large and small,” Engler said. “With this agreement, the NAM will make sure its members and the 225 associations that comprise the Council of Manufacturing Associations have access to all the resources of the Department of Energy to start saving energy.”

 

The memorandum of understanding between the NAM and DOE is available online at www.nam.org/energyefficiencyMOU.

 

The National Association of Manufacturers is the nation’s largest industrial trade association, representing small and large manufacturers in every industrial sector and in all 50 states. Headquartered in Washington, D.C., it has 11 additional offices across the country. Visit www.nam.org for more information about manufacturing and the economy.


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