For decades, the U.S. economy has been driven by the manufacturing industry. A perennial global leader, there never appeared to be a reason to change the ways of doing business, until now. The U.S. manufacturing industry is amid a reinvention, implementing Lean Transformation as a strategy for growth, harnessing employee creativity and innovation as a key competitive advantage in the global economy.

U.S. manufacturers are joining the growing trend in changing their management strategies, realigning their organizations with a Lean culture that emphasizes continuous learning and value creation. The results are employees who feel more satisfied in their jobs and are contributing to innovative, creative solutions that are delivering greater value to customers.

Three executive manufacturing leaders will share their Lean Transformation case studies with a crowd of 150-plus, fellow executives at an upcoming “Profiles of a Lean Transformation” seminar, hosted by Delaware Valley Industrial Resource Center, on December 14, at Whitemarsh Valley Country Club in Lafayette Hill, Pa.

“The United States represents less than 5% of the global population. Our ability to compete, create jobs and protect our quality of life will be through the quality and ingenuity of our people.” says Mark Basla, vice president of marketing and business development for DVIRC.

DVIRC is a leading private, non-profit economic development organization established in 1988 to serve the needs of nearly 5,000 small to mid-sized advanced manufacturing Enterprises (SME) in five counties throughout the Philadelphia region. The organization’s primary focus is to grow business value for clients through consulting services, talent development and regional, state and federal resource assistance, helping to establish the region as an internationally recognized leader in manufacturing competitiveness. We believe growing business value improves the standard of living and quality of life for those that live and/or work in the region. A diverse board of directors comprised of executives from the manufacturing, banking, legal and economic development communities govern the DVIRC.