Behr Dayton Thermal Products cited for electrical shock hazards

RP news wires
Tags: workplace safety

The U.S. Department of Labor's Occupational Safety and Health Administration has cited Behr Dayton Thermal Products LLC in Dayton, Ohio, with six serious and two repeat safety violations for failing to provide proper personal protective gear and lockout procedures for electrical equipment, resulting in a worker being injured. Proposed penalties total $77,500.

"Failing to properly shut down and lock out machinery and electrical equipment places workers at serious risk for injury and even death from electrical shock. Not requiring the use of appropriate personal protective gear while working on electrical equipment demonstrates a disregard for the safety and welfare of workers," said OSHA area director Richard Gilgrist in Cincinnati. "There is no excuse for this type of complacency, and OSHA will do all it can to protect employees in the workplace."

OSHA's inspection, which was initiated in June, cited the company with serious violations for failing to provide fall protection, proper lockout procedures for machinery and electrical equipment and appropriate personal protective gear for employees working on electrical equipment. An OSHA violation is serious if death or serious physical harm can result from a hazard an employer knew or should have known exists.

Behr Dayton Thermal Products also received repeat violations for failing to properly shut down and lock out machinery prior to servicing and to provide proper training for workers conducting repairs on equipment. A repeat violation is issued when an employer previously was cited for the same or similar violation of any standard, regulation, rule or order at any other facility in federal enforcement states within the last three years. Five prior inspections resulted in 20 violations.

The company has 15 business days from receipt of its current citations and penalties to comply, request an informal conference with OSHA's area director or contest the findings before the independent Occupational Safety and Health Review Commission.


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