Jobs with most injuries/illnesses resulting in days from work

RP news wires, Noria Corporation
Tags: workplace safety

Laborers and freight, stock, and material movers experienced the highest number of non-fatal occupational injuries and illnesses requiring days away from work in 2007 with 79,000, a 7-percent decline from 85,120 in 2006. This is according to data released by the U.S. Department of Labor's Bureau of Labor Statistics.

Occupational injuries and illnesses involving days away from work for selected occupations, 2007 (thousands)
[Chart data—TXT]

Following this occupation were heavy and tractor-trailer truck drivers (57,050), nursing aides, orderlies, and attendants (44,930), construction laborers (34,180), and light or delivery service truck drivers (32,930). Of these five occupations, only the light or delivery service truck drivers had an increase in cases (23 percent) from 2006.

In all, 10 occupations had more than 20,000 injuries and illnesses in 2007. These 10 occupations (including the five mentioned above) made up 33 percent of all injuries and illnesses with days away from work in 2007, and have had more than 20,000 injuries and illnesses every year since 2003.

This data is from the BLS Injuries, Illnesses, and Fatalities program. Additional information is available from "Non-fatal Occupational Injuries and Illnesses Requiring Days Away from Work, 2007," (PDF) (HTML) news release USDL 08-1716.


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