Ford Motor Company's actions to reduce the amount of energy used to manufacture vehicles and support its U.S. operations have earned it the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's coveted 2008 Energy Star Award. A three-time Energy Star Award winner, the 2008 award for Sustained Excellence recognizes Ford's continued leadership and commitment to protecting the environment through energy efficiency.

Ford accepted the award at a ceremony in Washington D.C. on April 1.

"Ford Motor Company is committed to the responsible use of resources," said Sue Cischke, group vice president, Sustainability, Environment and Safety Engineering. "Energy efficiency is critical to running a strong and successful business delivering both financial and environmental benefits."

In 2007, Ford improved energy efficiency in the U.S. by 4.5 percent resulting in savings of approximately $18 million. Since 2000, Ford's U.S. facilities have improved energy efficiency by nearly 30 percent, equivalent to the energy used to power 260,000 homes for a year.

One effort responsible for the reduction is a project to improve lighting systems – controls, fixtures, lamps and ballasts – in 26 million square feet of office, industrial and warehouse facilities. A combination of high-efficiency fluorescent lights and motion sensors has improved lighting efficiency by 50 percent in parts distribution centers alone.

As an Energy Star partner, Ford works closely with EPA Energy Star and Department of Energy to develop and share new technologies to reduce the carbon footprint of manufacturing operations. In a recent example, Ford shared its industry-leading advanced paint formulation and application technologies that significantly reduce energy consumption in paint shops while improving quality. Successful programs to improve energy efficiency of production tooling and building operations are being replicated across Ford's operations.

Ford continues to pursue alternative energy sources including geothermal cooling, landfill gas reclamation, wind and solar technology to power manufacturing plants in clean, sustainable ways. In the U.S., renewable, or "green," power supplies 5 percent of Ford's energy needs.

"We are proud to recognize Ford Motor Company’s continued efforts with the 2008 Energy Star Sustained Excellence award,” said Robert J. Meyers, principal deputy assistant administrator for EPA's Office of Air & Radiation. “Year after year, partners like Ford Motor Company are examples of the benefits of a long-term commitment to energy efficiency. Their actions are leading the way in saving energy and helping to protect the environment.”

About Energy Star:
Energy Star was introduced by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency in 1992 as a voluntary market-based partnership to reduce greenhouse gas emissions through increased energy efficiency. Today, in partnership with the U.S. Department of Energy, Energy Star offers businesses and consumers energy-efficient solutions to save energy, money, and help protect the environment for future generations. More than 12,000 organizations are Energy Star partners committed to improving the energy efficiency of products, homes, buildings and businesses.